books

I Heard Something Cover

I HEARD SOMETHING
Anvil Press / a feed dog book
Coming May 2018
In her uncompromising follow-up to 2012’s Sympathy Loophole, Jaime Forsythe offers a breathless cascade of evocative somethings: mysterious sounds, faint rumblings, biographies real and imagined, tabloid rumours, an animal stirring, a baby waking, a storm threatening, an escape hatch beckoning, and an inexplicable machine coughing into motion somewhere in the distance —

 

ADVANCE PRAISE

“Jaime Forsythe’s I Heard Something is a Rube Goldberg machine. It’s an arcing Tesla coil, a sparking lightning rod, a fine-tuned high-frequency reverb with escape velocity, and a gyroscopic field guide for living. This hypnagogic concatenation of poems surges with omens and prognostications, and deftly rewires our neural pathways.”
— SANDRA RIDLEY, AUTHOR OF SILVIJA

“In Jaime Forsythe’s superb new bookthe view is intimate yet global, our lives populated by objects, by intimations, by the poetry of the uncanny every day, the everyday uncanny, by the body, the self, touch-screen lungs, children, motherhood, the poetry discomfiting and comforting, witnessing and consoling. How do we frame our lives, our experience, against the splendid and bewildering flood of words? Forsythe has heard something. It feels electric to listen to what she has found.”
— GARY BARWIN, AUTHOR OF NO TV FOR WOODPECKERS

 ORDER
Halifax ~ Bookmark II

Lunenburg ~ Lexicon Books

World ~ Amazon    ~ Indigo

 

 

COVERFINALSYMPATHY LOOPHOLE
Mansfield Press / a stuart ross book
Spring 2012
buy here

This lively first collection, often both creepy and hilarious, serves up an image-laden universe — the sideshow we call home — where contortionists, womanizing ventriloquist dummies, and pickled sharks compete with the everyday for the mark’s hard-earned buck. Jaime Forsythe’s poetry is loaded with wit, mystery, surprise, and breathtaking juxtapositions — it’s a contemporary inventory of pop culture and human experience that proves the wacky and the poignant can share a seat in the same roller-coaster of a stanza.

REVIEWS
Canadian Literature
The Coast